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  • #90366
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    peterlanders
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    USB is just another set of outputs on the SQ, so there’s nothing special to do. You can send the Main LR mix to USB, or if you want to leave that alone you can set up a stereo Aux mix (with default board settings, there are a couple of stereo auxes already set up starting at the Mix 5 button). Any inputs you bring up in that mix will then be included in the output, USB or otherwise.

    You’ll need to route the mix output on the I/O screen. See section 6.4 in the reference guide (page 19) for a screen shot, and that whole chapter for detailed information. On the Outputs-Mix Out tab (on the left) select USB on the top. You’ll want to make sure the USB ‘source’ is set to USB-B. Patch the left and right channels of your main or aux mix to the desired USB output channels, and you’re all set. Just configure the software on your Mac to listen to the right inputs.

    #90094
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    peterlanders
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    As Flo84 posted above, A&H never give release dates or even ETAs. When it’s ready, it’ll be released. Just have to be patient…

    #89836
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    peterlanders
    Participant

    Nothing special to do, just plug in.

    #89768
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    peterlanders
    Participant

    Per the SLink Connections document, “It is not possible to connect two AR2412’s to one port (as the maximum number of dSnake inputs is 40).”

    So you would need to stick an SLink I/O card in the slot on your SQ to enable this.

    #89460
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    peterlanders
    Participant

    If you follow Mark’s link you’ll see that both of the standards illustrated (T568A and T568B) are doing exactly the same thing; they just put the colours in a slightly different order. The important thing is to make sure that the four twisted pairs in the cable are patched properly.

    You can safely pick either standard, as long as you use the same one on both ends. And as Mark says, it’s wise to pick a standard and then *stick* to it when making cables. Less likely to make stupid mistakes that way.

    I’ll also add: if you’re going to make your own cables, invest in a *good* crimper. Don’t just get one of the basic things that they used to sell at Radio Shack. These things can be fiddly to do, and if you don’t have the right tools and technique you’ll be troubleshooting bad connections forever.

    #89360
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    peterlanders
    Participant

    You can set any or all of the three matrix busses as either mono or stereo; see the reference manual page 63.

    There are two 1/4” outputs available that you can then patch mono matrices to through the I/O screen, but you’ll still need an adapter for the third one as you’ll need to use an XLR output there.

    There are still only three matrix busses available to you, whether you use them in stereo or mono. But from what you describe, three should do it for you.

    #89155
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    peterlanders
    Participant

    If you’re not familiar with digital boards in general, be sure to read through the reference manual in a fair bit of detail. I’ve found the overall structure of the SQ to be a lot more intuitive than most, but there are still things it took me a while to wrap my head around. It’s worth the effort!

    #89001
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    peterlanders
    Participant

    They’re a lot less common these days, but most LCD panel makers still say a handful of dead/stuck pixels is within normal tolerances. You’d have to contact A&H support to see what *their* policy is, though.

    As for me, as annoying as I’d find it, one or two wouldn’t be worth sending the console away. Of course, if more pixels started failing, that would be different.

    #88686
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    peterlanders
    Participant

    All you have to do is press the I/O key, tap Outputs, then Mix Out (both on the left side of the screen). Make sure you’re on the Local tab at the top as well; you probably are, though.

    Then, scroll down to find the MainLR L and R rows. Scroll right to reveal the A and B columns, then tap the grey square at the junction of MainLR L and A, and Main LR R and B, so they go white. You can have the same mix going to multiple outputs, so this won’t affect any existing patch.

    That’s it – you’re all set.

    This is pretty basic I/O routing stuff, you should definitely check out the reference manual starting on page 17.

    #88383
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    peterlanders
    Participant

    Sounds like you need to create an aux mix to route out to the SQ Drive or USB-A, not just direct your LR mix out there. That way you can set the fader and mix master levels independently for your record mix.

    Since it’s a digital board, remember that your software likely shows the 0 dB line right at the top of the meter, whereas the SQ shows it in pretty much the same way they do on an analog board, with +18 dB of additional headroom above. But that doesn’t change the fact that within the board 0 dB is where the signal will clip. So all else being equal, if your output level on the SQ is at the 0 line on the faders, it will correspond with -18 dB in your DAW. So on your record mix you’ll want to set your levels there, allowing plenty of room. If you’re trying to set levels based on the target in your software (say, -12 dB) directly with the faders, that would actually result in a -30 dB level in your software due to the difference in meter display.

    But really, the key here is to set up a separate mix for the recording. That way the fader levels will be independent from those for your main mix. If you make it Aux4, let’s say, you then just need to go into your IO patch screen and patch Aux4 L/R to the desired USB channels.

    If you haven’t already looked it up, download the reference manual and dive into the I/O Patching chapter starting on page 17. If this is your first digital board you’ll find there’s a LOT more flexibility in there than you’re used to, but it means a bit of digging at first!

    #88163
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    peterlanders
    Participant

    Careful Sparky, Joseph was asking about the DT, not the DX!

    The DT168 requires a Dante card. To use the SLink port you’d have to go with the DX168.

    As far as I can tell, the only significant difference between the two is the network scheme, so if you’ve got Dante infrastructure the DT might make more sense. But if you don’t, sticking with A&H’s ‘native’ format will require less configuration. AND it leaves your I/O spot free for future use.

    #88003
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    peterlanders
    Participant

    I very much doubt there’s anything specific to the SQ, but no reason you couldn’t go with one for a tablet (say, iPad mini) and cut it to fit.

    #87846
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    peterlanders
    Participant

    I’ve always been suspicious of Behringer’s shovelware approach and questionable build quality. There will always be people buying purely on the basis of how much stuff they get for the money (and that’s perfectly fine, everyone’s priorities are different), but I’m a lot happier paying a fair price for known quality. Keith has to be diplomatic, but I doubt A&H is fretting too much about B encroaching on their business.

    #87815
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    peterlanders
    Participant

    Would you not just adjust the gain/trim to a comfortable level in the Talkback settings screen?

    If you need more fine-grained control, you can skip the dedicated talkback button and use an input channel instead. Then you can control your level individually for each mix. You can still use the Talk socket, just patch it to the input channel of your choice. If you want to still have an easy toggle, just assign a soft key to the channel’s mute.

    #87749
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    peterlanders
    Participant

    Modern drives don’t have that particular issue; no need to park the heads these days, no matter what they’re connected to. Not like the early days when it was up to the controller to move the heads to a safe landing zone.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 75 total)