Why no hi-pass on Mix 1-10 (couldn't find answer)

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This topic contains 25 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of mervaka mervaka 6 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #43980
    Profile photo of ian.hind
    ian.hind
    Participant

    I know this has been talked about already, but I couldn’t find an answer.

    Is there a reason as to why there is no HPF on the Mix 1-10 outputs?

    I understand technically you could pull down frequencies on the GEQ, but for obvious EQ knowledge that isn’t desirable.

    Is this a hardware issue, not enough CPU power, or just not as requested as I would assume?

    #43981
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    It has been for sure requested. Maybe A&H didn’t have any free resources because of the “Qu-you” thing (the F-word comes always to my mind when I read “Qu-you”… strange name). Maybe the DSP can’t handle it. Nobody knows. Wait for the next firmware update and see if it’s there. If not, wait for the next one after that. If you really need it, you will have to buy another mixer. I’m stil hoping but it’s been almost a year now…

    #43986
    Profile photo of BLKGHOST
    BLKGHOST
    Participant

    May I ask why you may want to use a HPF on a Mix? For me, it’s like having one on the LR mix; just doesn’t make sense to me.

    #43989
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    Don’t you use any HPF on your monitor wedges? If your wedges are passive and your amps don’t have a built-in HPF you need one in the mixers auxes. If your FOH goes down to 35Hz but your (vocal) monitors will only do 80Hz and up you need separate HPF settings for FOH and for the auxes.

    #43990
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    If you have only active speakers with built-in HPFs and limiters and other kind of protection you of course don’t need any further HPFs in the mixer.

    #43991
    Profile photo of BLKGHOST
    BLKGHOST
    Participant

    That job belongs to a crossover. The only reasonable alternative I can give you is to cut the unwanted frequencies in the Mix GEQ.

    #43992
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    No, protecting a cab from too low frequencies is the job of exactly… a HPF. Trying to use the GEQ as a HPF makes everything even worse due to phase effects of the filters. Is is NOT recommended to use a GEQ as HPF.

    #43993
    Profile photo of BLKGHOST
    BLKGHOST
    Participant

    A crossover is a form of HPF. It`s not the job of the mixer to protect your equipment. Your equipment should be protected no matter what your audio source is. And notice that the HPF on the QU have a slope meaning that there is still some leaks under the cutoff point. This is a mixer. Not a speaker processor.

    #43994
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    I do know that this is not a speaker processor. What’s exactly your point? Is the SiEx1 a speaker processor? It has HPF on it’s auxes.

    A crossover is NOT a form of HPF. Is has at least one HPF and one LPF. But it’s used for something else.

    Protecting a cab from too low frequencies is not the job of a crossover. It’s the job of a HPF by definition. It can’t be done with a GEQ as you stated.

    Look at this measurement of the FCS960 (see pic attached). I’m sure that’s new to you. No protection at all at 10Hz, the GEQ even boosts that frequency when you pull down its three first filters (25, 31 and 40Hz).

    And: every HPF has a slope…

    #43997
    Profile photo of mervaka
    mervaka
    Participant

    I’m with BLKGHOST om this. Protection is something that should be either in the amp rack or in the speaker itself. All modern PA systems should have some form of processing.

    Putting protection into the desk is much like putting in a power amp. Not really its job, but a convenience for the lower end user.

    #43999
    Profile photo of BLKGHOST
    BLKGHOST
    Participant

    I know what a crossover is. It splits your signal into frequency bands and any decent one will let you choose the frequencies to do what you want. And have you ever heard of brick wall filters? No slope on that one. Good for them if they included HPF on all their Auxes. Still not the job of the mixer to protect the equipement. When I go to a venue with my mixer, I don’t ask for the specs of their cabs to make sure I don’t damage them. Protection should be at another level than the mixer. I also know that the alternative I gave you isn’t the best one. But since you seem to need one so bad, that’s the only one you have for now without getting new equipemnt.

    #44000
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    Mervaka, I agree. But maybe you just want less bass rumble or bleed on lower freqs on stage. Then it would become the job of the mixer again.

    #44002
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    Ghost, the alternative you gave is not just not the best one. It’s not an alternative at all. That’s something new to you for sure, else you woulnd’t have proposed such a thing.

    And have you ever heard a brick wall filter? Do they sound musical to your ears? Maybe that’s the reason why you won’t find them in any mixer.

    #44003
    Profile photo of BLKGHOST
    BLKGHOST
    Participant

    I never said they sounded good. I’m just saying that not all HPF have a slope and can be useful to do exactly what you want in the lower frequency range where you wouldn’t hear much of a difference while providing maximum protection.

    #44004
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    Maybe you can use the GEQ to reduce low freqs rumbling or bleeding. It depends on how wide the filters are. The FCS960 has two different widths, one for such a purpose.

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