How to? Multi-band and Dynamic EQ

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Jens-Droessler Jens-Droessler 8 years, 8 months ago.

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  • #23314
    Profile photo of tk2k
    tk2k
    Participant

    So now that we’re about to get these new FX/dynamics, I thought I’d ask all the people who have been asking for these features to explain why you wanted them and how they’re best used.

    Yes, I understand the theory of Dynamic EQ and Muti-Band compression from a technical perspective, but since there’s a limited number, how would you go about deciding what channels to apply it to, and what would benefit the most from the features?

    Basically: now that you have it (or, will soon) how do you plan to use it?

    iDR-48, T-112, Mixpad
    College

    #31494
    Profile photo of PeterM
    PeterM
    Participant

    quote:


    Originally posted by PeterM

    quote:


    Originally posted by tk2k

    So now that we’re about to get these new FX/dynamics, I thought I’d ask all the people who have been asking for these features to explain why you wanted them and how they’re best used.

    Yes, I understand the theory of Dynamic EQ and Muti-Band compression from a technical perspective, but since there’s a limited number, how would you go about deciding what channels to apply it to, and what would benefit the most from the features?

    Basically: now that you have it (or, will soon) how do you plan to use it?

    iDR-48, T-112, Mixpad
    College


    Typically you would use a dynamic EQ on the lead singer or on a vocal group.

    One of the most useful things you can do is automatically turn down that area around 3 to 4K where vocals often go a bit harsh especially at high volumes when the singer really goes for it so to speak.

    You can of course be a lot more creative with 4 bands of EQ but I would play with one band first.

    My old BSS 901s were one of my favourite toys, you could really get the vocal to sit nicely in the mix.

    Multiband compression can be used on vocals in a similar way. They are often used in mastering and broadcast applications. They can be used to increase overall level of sound, making it makes more audible in noisy environments such as a car.

    There is a bunch of stuff on the net for various applications, but if you have never used one before I would first try the dynamic EQ. Set it to where the vocal go harsh – (say 3k) when the singer gets loud set the ratio and threshold so that you pull about 6dB out , but nothing at normal levels. You can also use a normal compressor to keep control of the level as well.

    Peter


    Peter

    #31509
    Profile photo of dnxmirrorsounds
    dnxmirrorsounds
    Participant

    I am looking forward to using it on our Senior Pastor who projects well and so gets an incredible amount of energy in the midrange ~400-800.

    taming that should make it even better to listen to.

    thanks

    Duncan Whitcombe
    @Dnxmirrorsounds
    Mirror Sounds & metrochurch
    Perth, Australia
    T112, iDR48x2
    http://www.mirrorsounds.com.au
    http://www.metrochurch.org.au

    #31669
    Profile photo of Jens-Droessler
    Jens-Droessler
    Participant

    First of all, I’ll say again: I have no use for four bands of DynEQ on the same channel. One would be sufficient, two would be nice in very very few situations. More channels to apply the DynEQ would be much more useful (read: More simultaneuous inputs/outputs or as said before, make the limiter/deesser optionally switchable to DynEQ).

    So what to use ’em for:
    Basically the DynEQ can be used for every signal containing a frequency range that gets “strong” when the level rises. Like said singer, but also a guitar with unbalanced sound chanels. If the lead sound is too much of a saw, yet the clean chanel is rather muffled, you turn up the highs in the EQ and set the DynEQ to get active on those highs. It’ll catch them only when there is too much of them.
    You could use them on the vocals subgroup where the lowmids can get heavy when four or five singers are singing, but are just fine when only one of them is singing. So set the DynEQ for catching the too much lowmids only.
    The multiband compressor can be used to circumvent some of the problems of regular compressors, like the need for a deesser on higher compression. Specialised presets for vocals can work wonders on them.
    Also, you can get out a lot of energy out of single chanels or groups. Or you can use it to keep a certain level on a channel/group without getting that process noticeable.

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