QU library descriptions

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Barryjam Barryjam 4 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #61763
    Profile photo of Barryjam
    Barryjam
    Participant

    Given that I do understand that there are many of you who have honed your golden ears with years of experience and would never think of using a preset library (and I mean this with all respect and no sarcasm), I think I would still benefit from some descriptions of the rationale behind various PEQ, comp, gate, and especially effects preset libraries. Somebody connected with A&H had to program these settings. Are there descriptions associated with them besides the up-to-12 character names?

    For instance, if I see a reverb that is named stage, or live, or small room, does this mean that the programmer thought this would be a good starting point for someone …

    a) wanting to approximate the sound of a stage, live performance, or small room applied to an otherwise non-reverberant sound or mix?

    or does the programmer think this is a good starting point for
    b) a performer who is ALREADY actually on stage, in a live performance, or is playing in a small room.

    There must be some notes in A&H’s vaults on this. Or maybe not!

    #61764
    Profile photo of Giga
    Giga
    Participant

    a) usually

    Test it by playing some multitrack recordings with headphones and you’ll hear the magic happen.

    Giga

    #61766
    Profile photo of Barryjam
    Barryjam
    Participant

    Thanks, Giga. That (a) is what I presumed. Still, I think a number of novice and intermediate users would benefit from some elaborations of the various presets coming from the A&H designers.

    #61793
    Profile photo of dpdan
    dpdan
    Participant

    post deleted

    #61802
    Profile photo of airickess
    airickess
    Participant

    @barryjam, the naming convention of the Qu FX is standard for reverbs. It typically describes the reverb sound, not necessarily how, or in what situation, it should be used. Yes, it does differ from some of the presets for EQs or compressors, where they can describe the situation (mic EQ presets, male/female vocalist presets, etc.).
    The reverbs preset names can describe certain suggested usages (vocal plate, snare plate, etc.) but it is all subjective and, in my opinion, should be used as starting points. The more one does mixing the more one will learn about reverbs, types, uses, and conventions. Lately I’ve been doing some work with a cover band that does a number of different artists. Since that band wants the vocals and drums to sound very close to the recordings I have had to listen to all the different recorded tracks and dive into reverb, delay and echo settings to match them. Even after 27 years in the business it’s been a very good educational experience for me and has helped me tremendously.
    I like to think that effects such as reverb, delay and echo are the icing and decorations on the cake that is the mix. For live mixing, room and venue acoustics will help determine how much effects I will use on any particular song.

    #61806
    Profile photo of Barryjam
    Barryjam
    Participant

    Thanks, Airichess. Yes, its the education I seek. I play in cover bands, one of which is set-and-forget mixing from stage, wandering occasionally to edit via IPad. Pretty much one compromise verb per gig, not per song. Turn the verb off in 1/3 of the rooms.

    So, your cover band goes for deep authenticity—wonder if they do any Big Brother and the Holding Company tunes where they purposely keep the guitars not tuned? (;-)

    I like multitap delays with different values L and R, but when I engage tempo tap, L and R differences disappear. I know I could do L and R separately, but that’s too much work when I’m also playing keyboards.

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