Windows Console Interface

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This topic contains 24 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of [XAP]Bob [XAP]Bob 6 years, 2 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 25 total)
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  • #44647
    Profile photo of DoctorG
    DoctorG
    Participant

    Is it possible to operate a QU-series console using Windows via USB or ethernet? If so, what software is required?

    #44649
    Profile photo of [XAP]Bob
    [XAP]Bob
    Participant

    Nope, well unless here is an iOS emulator

    #44708
    Profile photo of SteffenR
    SteffenR
    Participant

    additional question… What means operate here?

    no remote control, no DAW control
    but ASIO/WDM driver and MIDI over USB and network

    software for Win is not available at this time, but we hope for it 🙂

    #44765
    Profile photo of DoctorG
    DoctorG
    Participant

    Since I have been evaluating digital consoles, I recently inquired to A&H sales about a Windows console interface and was told that they have no plans for such software. He referred to this feature as a “gadget feature.” This has caused me to give more serious consideration to other digital consoles.

    #44766
    Profile photo of ambulance23
    ambulance23
    Participant

    Do you the reason why they have no plans?

    #44767
    Profile photo of DoctorG
    DoctorG
    Participant

    He didn’t really say, just that he believes that Macs are better than PCs. As I have been a Windows user since the beginning of the OS, I do know that PC manufacturers have simply neglected the audio industry, and Apple has filled the void. It has been my experience, for example, that Windows laptops do not handle audio well – too much hum and power supply noise. In addition, the USB interface has bandwidth limitations, according to some, that may limit it’s use for multi-channel audio recording, as another example. This applies mostly to earlier USB implementations and has been eliminated with USB 3.0, but audio manufacturers in the meantime have gone to Firewire an Thunderbolt, a technology invented by Intel, I believe, but snubbed by most PC manufacturers. I could say more, but this is perhaps not the proper forum.

    #44769
    Profile photo of Andreas
    Andreas
    Moderator

    guys, you’re not stating to look for something else just because the Qu does not provide the HUI protocol on Windows?
    …and thanks for stating USB2 can not handle multitrack audio. Done exactly this using the Qu along with my old Windows notebook, didn’t yet figure out it doesn’t work…

    #44773
    Profile photo of DoctorG
    DoctorG
    Participant

    Exactly what did you do in multitrack using USB2 and a QU mixer? How many channels?

    #44774
    Profile photo of [XAP]Bob
    [XAP]Bob
    Participant

    Iirc full audio support via windows – channel count depends on console

    See 8.14 and 9 in the manual.

    #44776
    Profile photo of DoctorG
    DoctorG
    Participant

    I’m aware that A&H claims that one can do multichannel recording and playback via USB2 and that the number of channels depends on the console – duhh. I was asking Andres about his experience – how many channnels have you successfully used with USB2 without any problems, such as drop-outs? The earlier part of this thread has to do with Windows operational control of the console, not recording.

    #44777
    Profile photo of Andreas
    Andreas
    Moderator

    Bob, this really could have been getting fun… 😉

    Its not only me performing multitrack recording from the Qu to PC or Mac, which primarily depends if the host can handle that many streams properly. It is not a limit of USB2 (or classic FireWire which is slower!), in fact streaming 64 Channels (32in + 32out) at 48kHz and 24 Bits occupy about 70MBit/s of 480MBit/s USB2 could deliver, which is some 15%.

    Anyway, I’ve only recorded up to 30 streams from the Qu(32) in parallel due to a lack of input sources… First 18 channels contain some downmixes (toms, guitars) since I’ve used the QuDrive in parallel to record those for backup purposes.

    #44778
    Profile photo of [XAP]Bob
    [XAP]Bob
    Participant

    And my first response pointed out that without an iOS emulator there isn’t a Windows based remote control. There is an existing feature suggestion for an offline editor (which would likely make a trivial online editor as well).

    #44784
    Profile photo of Dick Rees
    Dick Rees
    Participant

    I can understand the desire to stick with Windows or Mac to stay in familiar territory, but I don’t understand why one would choose to spend significantly more money to purchase a digital console that would work with an existing computer when consoles are in the thousands of dollars and computers in the hundreds.

    The Qu series is still the best value for the money in a live/recording desk. I do my production work on Windows machines but picked up a factory refurbished Macbook and an iPad to work with the Qu. That said, I use a Seagate portable hard drive for USB multi-tracking and Sandisk Extremes for the Qu-drive. Once you have the .wav files, just load them into the computer/DAW of your choice.

    As to the USB2 “argument”, that has been thoroughly debunked so many times I’ve lost count. It works, we all use it. End of story.

    #44785
    Profile photo of Dick Rees
    Dick Rees
    Participant

    I can understand the desire to stick with Windows or Mac to stay in familiar territory, but I don’t understand why one would choose to spend significantly more money to purchase a digital console that would work with an existing computer when consoles are in the thousands of dollars and computers in the hundreds.

    The Qu series is still the best value for the money in a live/recording desk. I do my production work on Windows machines but picked up a factory refurbished Macbook and an iPad to work with the Qu. That said, I use a Seagate portable hard drive for USB multi-tracking and Sandisk Extremes for the Qu-drive. Once you have the .wav files, just load them into the computer/DAW of your choice.

    As to the USB2 “argument”, that has been thoroughly debunked so many times I’ve lost count. It works, we all use it. End of story.

    #44802
    Profile photo of DoctorG
    DoctorG
    Participant

    Dick, when you are dealing with a non-profit organization such as a church, cost is always a major consideration. So adding the cost of a PC into the price of a mixer is not trivial. In addition, volunteers don’t always have the time or ability to learn a new computer system, so it is important to stay with what they know, if possible. However, I do agree that the mixer and it’s features and performance are the important things.

    As to the USB matter, as I have been evaluating mixers, I get information from various sources regarding this. One place is the Presonus web site. Here is one article: Should I choose a FireWire or USB audio interface? (My first attempt to post a link – hope it works!) The basic advantages of Firewire are listed as (1) FireWire streams data rather than packets data, (2) FireWire is typically dedicated for audio/video purposes, thus avoiding interference from other services or hardware on your system, and (3) FireWire devices have the ability to cascade or daisy-chain components. The writer then gives some disadvantages of Firewire, which basically boil down to better compatibility of USB and its lower cost. Bandwidth, which USB3 has in spades, is not the whole issue.

    I don’t seem to find as much technical information on the A&H site. In forums like this, you get all kinds of opinions, many not completely spelled out and backed up with resources. You say, for example, that the USB argument has been thoroughly debunked, but give no references. A participant on another A&H thread mentions problems he’s been having with USB, so who is one to believe?

    I have a Firewire 800 card in my Windows desktop that is required for a Presonus mixer I use with one organization I support, and I use USB with another smaller mixer. Both work for my purposes, but my laptop does not support Firewire, so I can’t use it with the Presonus for recording, but can use it via ethernet for control of the console. Can’t do that with a QU-series mixer. Most laptops, if equipped with Firewire, only support FW400, but Presonus requires FW800, so multi-channel recording may be problematic with an inexpensive PC laptop and a Presonus mixer. At least A&H makes it possible to do multi-channel recording to a USB hard-drive or SSD. So, personally speaking, I’m on the fence with this issue.

    I agree with the thought expressed by a participant in another thread who lamented the fact that A&H is missing a large pool of possible users by not supporting Windows as a console interface.

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