Qu series, audio interface, home studio question!

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This topic contains 39 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Andreas Andreas 5 years, 9 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 40 total)
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  • #49544
    Profile photo of Lee7
    Lee7
    Participant

    The QU series desks have 3 layers in total. Main, Mix and Custom.

    🙂

    #49545
    Profile photo of ljefe
    ljefe
    Participant

    I am including the Mix Select “layers” because they use the faders as well and, in practice, function as another layer. When I get confused about where I am on the mixer, more often than not I am accidentally in a Mix Select layer rather than the “main” layer. I guess I could call it the Mix Select Area or Mix Select Fader Bank or something. It’s unimportant to the conversation.

    #49546
    Profile photo of [XAP]Bob
    [XAP]Bob
    Participant

    First thing to check is always which lights are lit – or to get into the habit of always returning to, e.g the custom layer, LR mix whenever fiddling finishes

    #49548
    Profile photo of ljefe
    ljefe
    Participant

    Yes, exactly. I’m trying to learn to always return to the main layer. The lights are plenty bright, I just need new habits.

    #49550
    Profile photo of Dick Rees
    Dick Rees
    Participant

    I think of returning to the main L/R layer as hitting “apply” after making my adjustments. This also helps me remember to hit “apply” when working on a processing screen…

    #49553
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    If its any help to you, I use Mac Core Audio
    I run my QU16 as a midi controller (ITB) and always use custom layer for that.
    I have used the QU 16 with Windows 7 (OTB) really sucessfully doing multi track recording and mixed down the data so was able to save all of the settings.
    And of course if you are working ITB you can always resample down or up using the rendering function of your software.

    Just some thoughts for you

    #49556
    Profile photo of ljefe
    ljefe
    Participant

    One thing not mentioned yet is that the Qu-16 doesn’t have physical channel inserts for compressors and EQs. That might be a consideration for the OP. I don’t know about inserts on the Qu-24 or the Qu-32?

    #49557
    Profile photo of Andreas
    Andreas
    Moderator

    I somehow doubt there’s any digital console around with physical channel inserts, since this would require an additional CODEC stage, particularly if the channel is sourced from USB or some digital snake. On the other hand any channel already is equipped with (in my opinion very nice and useable) PEQ/GATE/COMP.

    #49558
    Profile photo of Dick Rees
    Dick Rees
    Participant

    Andreas…

    The only one I know that has pre-converter inserts is the Presonus StudioLive.

    #49569
    Profile photo of MarkPAman
    MarkPAman
    Participant

    Mackie’s, (now long discontinued) TT24 had them too.

    #49571
    Profile photo of Andreas
    Andreas
    Moderator

    ok, I see. But both do not interface to digital snakes.
    At least I did not not miss channel inserts on the Qu yet and be happy my siderack can stay at home now. Studio use may be a different story, but there I’d personally prefer to record as pure as possible and make sound inside the DAW.

    #49572
    Profile photo of Ben
    Ben
    Participant

    I am having a similar decision at the moment as well. How big of a deal is the sample rate? I am looking at a Qu Pac w/ a stage box, a Qu-24, or the newer Presonus RM32AI. The Presonus having the higher 96 khz sample rate.

    #49578
    Profile photo of Andreas
    Andreas
    Moderator

    Since the samplingrate question is discussed plenty of times, just some points to consider:
    – Except for philosophical standpoints a samplingrate above 48kHz make limited sense in terms of relevant audio quality for the human ear.
    – Running a higher samplingrate within the DAW makes some sense since this will simplify correct operation of some VST instruments (i.e. virtual analog synths) or effects and enhance precision of filters.
    – 48 or 96kHz are useful if you’re producing audio for video.
    – If you’re targeting CD, your final samplingrate need to be 44.1kHz. If your “soundcard” only supports 48/96kHz your DAW either needs to be able to resample on the fly (not necessarily the best option) or you’re producing at 48/96kHz and convert when exporting the final files.
    – If you’re targeting CD and prefer to run your DAW at a higher samplingrate, 88.2kHz would be your choice.
    – Downsampling a finalized 48/96Hz file to 44.1kHz is an extra step but nowadays should work without significant drop in soundquality. Directly exporting to 44.1kHz from a 48/96kHz project may have some surprise…

    I’m producing audio (no VST instruments) at 44.1/48kHz for some decades now and never saw a big need for higher samplingrates.

    #49579
    Profile photo of [XAP]Bob
    [XAP]Bob
    Participant

    You should be able to up sample after the fact, the signal will still be band limited to <24kHz, but upsampling is a pure mathematical function.

    If that helps with daw processing then knock your socks off. Just apply a new bandpass and downsample (to 44.1kHz) afterwards

    #49581
    Profile photo of Dick Rees
    Dick Rees
    Participant

    . How big of a deal is the sample rate?

    It’s right up there with the choice of color of the console…

    (sarcasm)

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