GLD 80 and GLD 112 difference

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of blazee1 blazee1 7 years ago.

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  • #39273
    Profile photo of blazee1
    blazee1
    Participant

    Hai. Can anybody tell me the main differences between GLD 80 and GLD 112. My doubt is mainly regarding how much inputs we can get on these mixers. For eg: With GLD 80 we can get 48 inputs on the faders. ie using a AR 2412 + two AR 84 total 40 inputs plus 8 on the mixer totalling 48 inputs on the input fader section (Bank 1 in 4 layers).
    In GLD 112 it is 12 faders in bank 1 in 4 layers = 48 inputs.
    8 faders in bank 2 in 4 layers = 32 inputs.

    So it should be total 80 inputs that we can control using the faders. But in the manual and in the review video it says we can connect only 48 inputs (one AR 2412 + two AR 84). I dont understand that. Can anybody please clarify me this part.

    #39276
    Profile photo of Chris93
    Chris93
    Participant

    They’re both the same mixer inside, the 112 just gives you more faders and softkeys with which to control it.

    Chris

    #39283
    Profile photo of blazee1
    blazee1
    Participant

    Thank you Chris. But did you get what i was mentioning. GLD 80 has 12faders x 4 layers = 48 inputs we can control. one AR 2412 + two AR 84.

    GLD112 has 20 faders x 4 layers = 80 inputs that we should get to control. But in the manual it says we can connect only one AR 2412 + two AR 84. So we can control only 40 inputs from the Racks plus the eight inputs on the back of the mixer. So what about thye balance 32 faders ?

    #39284
    Profile photo of Chris93
    Chris93
    Participant

    The mixers don’t control the stage racks, the stage racks just supply remote inputs and outputs for the mixer. It isn’t like the iLive where the processing is in the rack, with GLD the processing is in the mixer and the stage rack and cat5 cable is the equivalent of an analog multicore.

    Chris

    #39285
    Profile photo of Chris93
    Chris93
    Participant

    You can change the strip assign settings to put any input or any mix on whatever fader or combination of faders you like. The whole console is like one big “custom user layer”. Having more faders just lets you see more things at once without having to change layers.

    Chris

    #39288
    Profile photo of GCumbee
    GCumbee
    Participant

    As a dealer I am partial but I feel it is a great console. I have both models as demos. Another dealer friend of mine in Nashville put a 112 in a church in Raliegh, NC last week. They used it Easter Sunday first time. They were thrilled. Without changing anything else they said their system sounded better than ever. They were coming off an old AH analog board they loved but wanted recall.

    #39290
    Profile photo of pilotspike
    pilotspike
    Participant

    We went from an old analog mackie to an GLD112 and the improvement in sound was astonishing. We were not expecting that at all. Actually I ate crow on that one as I was championing the upgrade from a capability perspective, not a sonic one. Easy crow to eat though as it was a win win.

    My perspective on this is to go with the 112 if you will ever use any more than 24 channels or so. You will eat up real state fast once you get your inputs setup and use any groups or any number of the effects rack slots. We were not able to financially pull the trigger on the 80 when it came out and feel very blessed now that that was the case. Had we ended up with the 80 and not the 112 managing some of our services would have been more difficult with the smaller console size.

    either way these are slamming systems.

    John

    #39291
    Profile photo of Chris93
    Chris93
    Participant

    Exactly the same experience with the system sounding better, thought it was coming from an old spirit with a broken PSU. 🙂

    Chris

    #39297
    Profile photo of GSLC-Tech
    GSLC-Tech
    Participant

    GLD 112, Dante, 2412 2×84. +1 for sounding amazing. We had the same story of having to wait for a budget to get a GLD, the 112 popped up about 4 months before we were ready to purchase. The extra 8 faders made our lives a whole lot easier. We have 48 inputs on stage, but we also have 8 wireless systems. We use all 44 xlr inputs and one of the rca inputs. For a Sunday service, we might use at most 24 inputs. On the top layer, we also have 2 DCA’s and 2 other group faders. Don’t forget monitor mixes and fx. Things fill up fast. Amazing board, I know we have not exercised even a fraction of the capabilities.

    #39315
    Profile photo of cornelius78
    cornelius78
    Participant

    Short version: as others have said, the DSP (and limitations of 48/30/20) are the same for both the GLD80 and GLD112. The extra faders on the 112 can be used to control whatever you want: input channels, buses, fx send and returns, DCAs, LRM and matrices. It’s just a higher assignable fader count, not a higher channel/bus count; a fader doesn’t necessarily have to control an input channel.

    Long version: the GLD80 is called such because it has 80 “strips:” (4×12)+(4×8)=48+32=80.

    These 80x strips can be used to control a combination of inputs (local or remote preamps, local line level, local USB 2-track, expansion card (Dante, ADAT, MADI etc,) to a maximum of 48,) bus masters, fx sends and returns, DCAs and matrices. You can assign anything to any fader you want. As with a lot of digital systems with remote stageboxes, high channel counts and assignable faders, it’s best to think of “inputs,” “channels,” and “faders,” as three separate things.

    Your “inputs” are the remote preamps on the AR2412 and AR84, the local preamps on the console itself, the local RCA inputs, the local USB 2-track, and whatever you’ve got coming in via expansion card (Dante, MADI, ADAT etc.) In theory, you could have 112 “inputs” (40x remote, 8x local, 64x Dante) plugged into the desk at the same time.

    If you want to process or mix those inputs in any way, you have to assign those “inputs” to “channels.” Both the GLD80 and GLD112 essentially have the same “brains” (DSP,) and can “process” up to a maximum of 44mono and 2stereo channels at a time. You might source all 48 channels from remote preamps and local IO, as is the default. You might have some channels source from the remote stage boxes, and some from the expansion card. You might do virtual y-splits so that two channels are share the same input preamp, but can have different processing applied to each (useful for sending one channel with appropriate dyn and eq to FOH, and the other with different dyn and eq to monitors.) You might not use any stageboxes at all and have all your channels sourced from a Dante card for a virtual sound check. You might be doing a small corporate gig and only be using the local IO for some wireless mics and some stereo playback from an ipod. No matter which way you organise it, you’ve got a maximum of 48 channels to process and mix at the time. The 8x stereo fx returns are counted separately from the 48, however they don’t have full processing; from memory they only have peq. If you want dynamics control on an fx return you can either route it to a bus and apply dynamics to the bus, or you can route it to a (pair of) “proper” channels, (which have full processing,) in which case it will count toward the 48 channel limit.

    Now that you’ve assigned which “inputs” (48 or less) are going to be the “active channels” you’re processing, you then need to assign those channels to faders. By default ch1-48 appears on the 4x layers of the bank of 12, and the bank of 8 gets DCAs, bus masters, fx sends and returns, matrices etc, essentially dividing the board into an “inputs-on-the-left, outputs-on-the-right” sort of setup. You can re-arrange them however you want though, and assign the same channel to multiple faders (eg you could assign your money channel to fader(X) on all 4 layers, so no matter which layer you’re on, you’ve always got access to the money channel without having to switch layers,) or have some channels not assigned to any faders (eg using a DCA as a mute group and assigning it to a softkey, or having an fx return at unity and just control it using the fx send master, or vice-versa.) You can set it up whichever way is most comfortable for you to mix.

    You can use different show\scene recall with the appropriate safings to quickly change the desk’s configuration to jump between different input/channel/fader routing. Also note that there’s not actually enough faders on the GDL80 to control everything all an once (44mono+2stereo+8fxsend+8fxrtn+16DCA = 78 strips, and that with no buses, mains or mtxs. You’d need another 18 faders (the GLD112 provides an extra 32, yay) if you wanted fader control of everything. Thankfully, users of the GLD80 seem to get by without having fader control of everything, probably due to anything stereo only occupying one fader, using some DCAs as mute groups and assigning them to a softkey instead of a fader, leaving either the fx send or rtn at unity and un-assigning it from the surface, ganging faders on pairs of channels/buses and un-assigning one side, not using all 48 ins, all 30x buses and all 16x DCAs etc.

    The GLD112 is called such because it has 112 “strips:” (4×12)+(4×8)+(4×8) = 48+32+32=112.

    As with the GLD80, these 112 strips can be used to control inputs, bus masters, fx sends and returns, DCAs, matracies and the input/channel/fader setup is the same as for the GLD80. As the GLD112’s DSP is the same as the GLD80’s, you’ve still got a maximum of 112 inputs, assigned to 48x channels, into 30x buses into 20outs.

    The difference is that with the increased fader count, you now have 8 additional faders on 4 layers, (so really and additional 32 faders) to which you can assign those 48 channels/buses/DCAs etc. This means more channels/buses/DCAs etc are immediately available to you; you don’t have to jump through layers as much. The GLD112 also has an additional 4x softkeys (total of 14, as opposed to the 10 softkeys found on the GLD80,) and a sort of mini-ledge on which you could sit an ipad, or a setlist etc.

    The disadvantages include initial cost, weight, space required in a truck and at the mix position etc.

    AFAIK they’re the only differences: it’s only an increased assignable fader count, NOT an increase in DSP capability.

    If simultaneously processing 48 channels into 30x buses into 20x outs is not enough for your application, you need to look at other desks. The iLive will do 64(+fx rtns)/32, other systems from other manufacturers will do more still.

    You can assign an input/bus, (and it doesn’t have to be one of the 48 “active channels”) directly to an output (either physical or expansion card,) essentially using the IO as a routing matrix. Apart from a polarity flip on the output you wont have any sort of control over the signal if it isn’t part of the 48/30, but it can be useful in some situations, eg sending playback from a PC to another room. As long as you control the level from the PC itself (not the GLD,) and/or the other room has a level control, and you have the spare output, you can do this without burning up any of your 48/30.)

    HTH

    #39334
    Profile photo of blazee1
    blazee1
    Participant

    Thank you Cornelius. Pls check ur msg box

    #39380
    Profile photo of blazee1
    blazee1
    Participant

    Thank you everyone for the comments. Now i got it.

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