GEQ always peaking

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Zak Zak 1 year, 4 months ago.

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  • #87810
    Profile photo of Zak
    Zak
    Participant

    Hello everybody, so at my current church we using a GLD 80 and what I notice is when I select my mono aux and head to the GEQ most frequencies are peaking already. even when I bring them down completely. this makes it very hard to get rid of feedback already sent i dont know which frequency it’s peaking. any solutions? thanks.

    #87832
    Profile photo of Zak
    Zak
    Participant

    Apologies for bad grammar, postedb late last night.😂👐

    #87845
    Profile photo of Chris93
    Chris93
    Participant

    This doesn’t mean anything is clipping, it’s just an RTA indicator with the highest amplitude band highlighted in red. This is based on the PAFL bus signal.

    Chris

    #87854
    Profile photo of Zak
    Zak
    Participant

    Thanks, however if I’m planning to ring out monitors where would I know which frequencys are giving problems as most frequencies show peakstix?
    Thanks Zak

    #87858
    Profile photo of Scott
    Scott
    Participant

    When ringing out monitors there will be no signal passing through the mix, and you will gradually increase the volume until something starts to ring. The spectrum analyzer will clearly show which frequency band that it is closest to.

    If you are trying to isolate feedback during a show, then the analyzer may or may not show that frequency depending on how loud it is in relation to other signals.

    If you properly do the first part (ring out the monitors), then the possibility for feedback during the show should be greatly reduced.

    #87867
    Profile photo of Zak
    Zak
    Participant

    Could you possibly show me how to do this, or link a tutorial? A visual representation or a detailed description would greatly help.

    Thanks Zak.

    #87883
    Profile photo of Scott
    Scott
    Participant

    There are several different approaches to this, but this is a more traditional approach using the GEQ. I find that the Digi-GEQ works best because it makes narrower cuts than the other models.

    1. Get your monitor mixes close to what they will actually be during a service.
    2. Mute all other outputs except for the one that you are currently working on. Work on one at a time.
    3. Turn off all gates on the microphones on stage. Gates can hinder trying to get feedback to ring out monitors / mains.
    4. Select the mix that you are currently working on. Mix button lit up on master fader for current monitor mix.
    5. Gradually increase the master volume until something starts to ring.
    6. Isolate the frequency and decrease that frequency by about 3db, or until that freq stops ringing, whichever is greater.
    7. Go back to step 5 above, and continue until you get the master much higher than it would actually be during a service.

    Do this once for each monitor mix, and optionally your main LR mix. When finished don’t forget to turn on any gates that you originally had engaged on the input channels.

    Another approach is to repeat steps 1 through 4 above, and to use the PEQ instead of the GEQ. Start with the first band and set the width to narrow, and boost by 3db. Sweep that band until it starts to ring. If it rings change it from a 3db boost, to a 3db cut. If it doesn’t ring increase it to a 6db boost and repeat. When you find the offending frequency set it to a 3db cut. Repeat this with the remaining 3 bands on the PEQ on that mix output.

    #87886
    Profile photo of Scott
    Scott
    Participant

    For feedback during a show, learn how to identify the different frequencies and what they sound like. That way when something is ringing, you can go “oh that’s around 500Hz”, and know where to start cutting. With multiple monitor mixes, you will also want to find the source mix of where the ring originated. This is sometimes tricky.

    You can train your ears for frequency identification using the included signal generator in the GLD. Go to a GEQ and write down all of the frequency centers; 31, 40, 50, 63, etc.

    Next either use an unused channel and map the sig gen to that channel or send it to a mix that you can easily hear like the mains. Do this when no one else is around, as it will likely annoy them. 🙂

    Set the freq to one of the centers and gradually increase the volume until you can hear that frequency. It doesn’t need to be loud. Repeat this regularly with each of the frequency bands.

    Eventually you will start to be able to identify the different bands just by hearing them. Test this by getting a helper to pick a band center and see if you can identify it. This takes time to learn, but is useful during the show, once you have trained your ears.

    #87888
    Profile photo of Scott
    Scott
    Participant

    P.S. Signal type will be SINE on the signal generator.

    #87898
    Profile photo of Zak
    Zak
    Participant

    YOU ARE A LEGEND BRO! So I suppose it would work if I selected the monitor and GEQ Fader flip while having the RTA on Sine, on the soft touch panel. This will identify the frequency’s for me during me ringing them out. Then after I train my ears I can bring the frequency down.

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